Jewel of the Seas

Jewel of the Seas

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Limassol

Cyprus' second-largest city appeals to a wide range of tourists, from those interested in sun and sand vacations to those who prefer to delve into the island's culture at its museums and sites of archaeological interest. This large seaside resort on Akrotiri Bay on the sunny southern coast offers lively nightlife and a slew of energetic festivals. A cornucopia of cafes and bars lines the bustling seafront. Accommodation options range from villas and self-catering apartments to luxurious hotels.

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Limassol

Cyprus' second-largest city appeals to a wide range of tourists, from those interested in sun and sand vacations to those who prefer to delve into the island's culture at its museums and sites of archaeological interest. This large seaside resort on Akrotiri Bay on the sunny southern coast offers lively nightlife and a slew of energetic festivals. A cornucopia of cafes and bars lines the bustling seafront. Accommodation options range from villas and self-catering apartments to luxurious hotels.

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Piraeus (Athens)

Piraeus is the gateway to Athens , which, in turn, is rightfully considered the center of the centers of the whole world, with the main attraction - the acropolis. Piraeus is an old port city serving the port of Athens, the largest port in Greece to date. Piraeus is part of the great Athens, which boasts an abundance of attractions, including unique monuments of national fine art. More than two hundred museums and galleries, including the University History Museum, the Ceramics Archaeological Museum and many others, will hospitably welcome you within their walls and familiarize themselves with the culture of this area.

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Mykonos

Mykonos is a Greek island, part of the Cyclades, lying between Tinos, Syros, Paros and Naxos. The island spans an area of 85.5 square kilometres (33.0 sq mi) and rises to an elevation of 341 metres (1,119 feet) at its highest point. There are 10,134 inhabitants (2011 census), most of whom live in the largest town, Mykonos, which lies on the west coast. The town is also known as Chora (i.e. the Town in Greek, following the common practice in Greece when the name of the island itself is the same as the name of the principal town).

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Santorini, Cyclades

Santorini, classically Thera, and officially Thira, is an island in the southern Aegean Sea, about 200 km (120 mi) southeast of Greece's mainland. It is the largest island of a small, circular archipelago, which bears the same name and is the remnant of a volcanic caldera. It forms the southernmost member of the Cyclades group of islands, with an area of approximately 73 km2 (28 sq mi) and a 2011 census population of 15,550. The municipality of Santorini includes the inhabited islands of Santorini and Therasia and the uninhabited islands of Nea Kameni, Palaia Kameni, Aspronisi, and Christiana. The total land area is 90.623 km2 (34.990 sq mi).Santorini is part of the Thira regional unit.

The island was the site of one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recorded history: the Minoan eruption(sometimes called the Thera eruption), which occurred about 3,600 years ago at the height of the Minoan civilization. The eruption left a large caldera surrounded by volcanic ash deposits hundreds of metres deep. It may have led indirectly to the collapse of the Minoan civilization on the island of Crete, 110 km (68 mi) to the south, through a gigantic tsunami. Another popular theory holds that the Thera eruption is the source of the legend of Atlantis.

It is the most active volcanic centre in the South Aegean Volcanic Arc, though what remains today is chiefly a water-filled caldera. The volcanic arc is approximately 500 km (310 mi) long and 20 to 40 km (12 to 25 mi) wide. The region first became volcanically active around 3–4 million years ago[citation needed], though volcanism on Thera began around 2 million years ago with the extrusion of dacitic lavas from vents around the Akrotiri.

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Santorini, Cyclades

Santorini, classically Thera, and officially Thira, is an island in the southern Aegean Sea, about 200 km (120 mi) southeast of Greece's mainland. It is the largest island of a small, circular archipelago, which bears the same name and is the remnant of a volcanic caldera. It forms the southernmost member of the Cyclades group of islands, with an area of approximately 73 km2 (28 sq mi) and a 2011 census population of 15,550. The municipality of Santorini includes the inhabited islands of Santorini and Therasia and the uninhabited islands of Nea Kameni, Palaia Kameni, Aspronisi, and Christiana. The total land area is 90.623 km2 (34.990 sq mi).Santorini is part of the Thira regional unit.

The island was the site of one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recorded history: the Minoan eruption(sometimes called the Thera eruption), which occurred about 3,600 years ago at the height of the Minoan civilization. The eruption left a large caldera surrounded by volcanic ash deposits hundreds of metres deep. It may have led indirectly to the collapse of the Minoan civilization on the island of Crete, 110 km (68 mi) to the south, through a gigantic tsunami. Another popular theory holds that the Thera eruption is the source of the legend of Atlantis.

It is the most active volcanic centre in the South Aegean Volcanic Arc, though what remains today is chiefly a water-filled caldera. The volcanic arc is approximately 500 km (310 mi) long and 20 to 40 km (12 to 25 mi) wide. The region first became volcanically active around 3–4 million years ago[citation needed], though volcanism on Thera began around 2 million years ago with the extrusion of dacitic lavas from vents around the Akrotiri.

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Santorini, Cyclades

Santorini, classically Thera, and officially Thira, is an island in the southern Aegean Sea, about 200 km (120 mi) southeast of Greece's mainland. It is the largest island of a small, circular archipelago, which bears the same name and is the remnant of a volcanic caldera. It forms the southernmost member of the Cyclades group of islands, with an area of approximately 73 km2 (28 sq mi) and a 2011 census population of 15,550. The municipality of Santorini includes the inhabited islands of Santorini and Therasia and the uninhabited islands of Nea Kameni, Palaia Kameni, Aspronisi, and Christiana. The total land area is 90.623 km2 (34.990 sq mi).Santorini is part of the Thira regional unit.

The island was the site of one of the largest volcanic eruptions in recorded history: the Minoan eruption(sometimes called the Thera eruption), which occurred about 3,600 years ago at the height of the Minoan civilization. The eruption left a large caldera surrounded by volcanic ash deposits hundreds of metres deep. It may have led indirectly to the collapse of the Minoan civilization on the island of Crete, 110 km (68 mi) to the south, through a gigantic tsunami. Another popular theory holds that the Thera eruption is the source of the legend of Atlantis.

It is the most active volcanic centre in the South Aegean Volcanic Arc, though what remains today is chiefly a water-filled caldera. The volcanic arc is approximately 500 km (310 mi) long and 20 to 40 km (12 to 25 mi) wide. The region first became volcanically active around 3–4 million years ago[citation needed], though volcanism on Thera began around 2 million years ago with the extrusion of dacitic lavas from vents around the Akrotiri.

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Rhodes

Rhodes is the largest of the Dodecanese islands of Greece and is also the island group's historical capital. Administratively the island forms a separate municipality within the Rhodes regional unit, which is part of the South Aegean administrative region. The principal town of the island and seat of the municipality is Rhodes. The city of Rhodes had 50,636 inhabitants in 2011. It is located northeast of Crete, southeast of Athens and just off the Anatolian coast of Turkey. Rhodes' nickname is The island of the Knights, named after the Knights of Saint John of Jerusalem, who once conquered the land.

Historically, Rhodes was famous worldwide for the Colossus of Rhodes, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The Medieval Old Town of the City of Rhodes has been declared a World Heritage Site. Today, it is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Europe. The name of the U.S. state of Rhode Island is thought to be based on this island.

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Rhodes

Rhodes is the largest of the Dodecanese islands of Greece and is also the island group's historical capital. Administratively the island forms a separate municipality within the Rhodes regional unit, which is part of the South Aegean administrative region. The principal town of the island and seat of the municipality is Rhodes. The city of Rhodes had 50,636 inhabitants in 2011. It is located northeast of Crete, southeast of Athens and just off the Anatolian coast of Turkey. Rhodes' nickname is The island of the Knights, named after the Knights of Saint John of Jerusalem, who once conquered the land.

Historically, Rhodes was famous worldwide for the Colossus of Rhodes, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The Medieval Old Town of the City of Rhodes has been declared a World Heritage Site. Today, it is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Europe. The name of the U.S. state of Rhode Island is thought to be based on this island.

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Rhodes

Rhodes is the largest of the Dodecanese islands of Greece and is also the island group's historical capital. Administratively the island forms a separate municipality within the Rhodes regional unit, which is part of the South Aegean administrative region. The principal town of the island and seat of the municipality is Rhodes. The city of Rhodes had 50,636 inhabitants in 2011. It is located northeast of Crete, southeast of Athens and just off the Anatolian coast of Turkey. Rhodes' nickname is The island of the Knights, named after the Knights of Saint John of Jerusalem, who once conquered the land.

Historically, Rhodes was famous worldwide for the Colossus of Rhodes, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The Medieval Old Town of the City of Rhodes has been declared a World Heritage Site. Today, it is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Europe. The name of the U.S. state of Rhode Island is thought to be based on this island.

  • Departure 21 Aug
    Sat
    2021
  • From the port Limassol Cyprus
  • On a cruise 8 days 7 nights
  • Arrival 28 Aug
    Sat
    2021
  • Cost From ₽ 60,423
    € 677
    $ 797
Code: 30,775,416
English
Total cost | Online Availability | Create request

Cruise 7 nights, from Limassol on the cruise ship Jewel of the Seas from Royal Caribbean International

Map of cruise 30775416
Port Date Arrival Departure
1 Limassol Cyprus 21 Aug, Sat 0:00 20:00
2 Day at sea Sea 22 Aug, Sun 0:00 0:00
3 Piraeus (Athens) Greece 23 Aug, Mon 8:00 20:00
4 Mykonos Greece 24 Aug, Tue 7:00 20:00
5 Santorini, Cyclades Greece 25 Aug, Wed 7:00 20:00
6 Chania (Souda), Crete Greece 26 Aug, Thu 7:00 18:00
7 Rhodes Greece 27 Aug, Fri 7:00 15:00
8 Limassol Cyprus 28 Aug, Sat 7:00 0:00

A cruise ship

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Cruise ship description

  • Characteristic Value
  • Length293
  • Decks13
  • Speed24
  • Capacity2500

Launched in 2004, Jewel of the Seas is the last 4th Radiance-class Royal Caribbean ship, together with Brilliance, Serenade and Radiance.

History - construction and ownership

Royal Caribbean International (RCI) is an US company, trademarked brand and subsidiary owned by Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd (RCCL, shipowner). RCI was established in 1968 and currently has over 1/5 of the worldwide cruise market. RCI also has RCCL's largest fleet as both number of vessels and GT tonnage (ship sizes and capacities). All Royal Caribbean liners have names ending with "of the Seas".

At 90 090 tons (that counts on the high end of medium-sized ships nowadays), Jewel of the Seas, just like her siblings, has just enough space for some of the storied Royal Caribbean innovations, such as wonderful alternative dining venues, superb solarium pool, a rock-climbing wall and expansive Adventure Ocean children amenities. The 2,500-passenger Jewel of the Seas maintains a relatively low crew-to-guest ratio. The ship feels practically petite in comparison to her newer, bigger Oasis- and Voyager-class fleetmates. However, Jewel is big enough to offer a variety of dining options and entertainment, yet small enough to offer more immersive itineraries than bigger Royal Caribbean vessels. Like all Radiance-class cruise ships, Jewel of the Seas features glass throughout its interior, thus granting passengers plenty of ocean views.

After the 2016 refurb, new amenities are to be added, such as new restaurants - Izumi (Asian), Giovanni’s Table (Italian), new bar, poolside outdoor theater. The Jewel will also boast shipwide Wi-Fi coverage with VOOM, the fastest internet at sea, new digital signage and cabin renovations (with flat TVs in all cabins).

Cabins

Jewel Of The Seas has a total of 1057 cabins (of which 60 Suites, 517 Balcony rooms) in 24 grades. Most Jewel of the Seas staterooms are 160-190-sq.foot balcony rooms and 160-sq.foot insides (238). 19 are the wheelchair accessible rooms. The largest aboard Jewel of the Seas are the Royal Suites (1155 ft2 /107 m2).

Shipboard dining options - Food and Drinks

The kitchen onboard Jewel of the Seas is consistently fine. The main dining venue, especially at dinner, is where nearly half the cruise liner is ordering and eating simultaneously. The service is first-class in all zones. The Tides Dining Room is ship's 2-level main restaurant, decorated with a moonlight and tide romantic theme. Food is nicely presented and well prepared. The elegant room features tables on two levels and wonderful views of the vessel's wake. The menu offers several choices of salads, starters and soups, main courses, cheese and desserts. The Windjammer Cafe is Jewel's main buffet venue. It is open for breakfast, lunch, afternoon snacks and informal dinner. Numerous stations serve up pasta, burgers, salads and sweets. Portofino and Chops Grille are ship's alternative restaurants. Chops is a steakhouse venue with an open kitchen. Enjoyable as Chops is, the real highlight of Jewel's onboard dining is Portofino with favorites including tiger shrimp risotto and spaghetti with lobster sauce. Both Chops Grille and Giovanni’s Table levy a per-person service fee.

Follows the complete list of Jewel of the Seas restaurants and food bars.

  • Tides Restaurant (1112-seat aft Dining Room has a small private dining room (Shoreside).

  • Windjammer Cafe lido buffet restaurant (680-seat, offers Early Breakfast at 6:30 a.m., Breakfast between 7:00-11:30 a.m., Lunch 11.30-3:30 p.m. and Dinner 6.30-9:00 p.m.)

  • Chops Grille (86-seat specialty restaurant; reservations recommended)

  • Portofino (95-seat Italian restaurant) during refurbishment 2016 was replaced by Giovanni’s Table (Italian specialty restaurant).

  • Seaview Cafe (104-seat complimentary fast food and coffee bar) during refurbishment 2016 was replaced by Izumi (Asian specialty restaurant).

Shipboard entertainment options - Fun and Sport

The tone aboard Jewel of the Seas is set by the Centrum, which serves as a central spot for activities in the heart of the ship. During the evenings, its Lobby Bar is the hottest spot on Jewel for after-dinner dancing. The lavish, 3-deck Coral Theater hosts the production shows and games. The ship has a real modern feel and does a fine job in incorporating some of the best facilities that have become Royal Caribbean trademarks. Onboard cruisers will find classics like Schooner Bar and Windjammer Cafe, as well as a climbing wall up the smokestack, tiny golf and a waterslide. Other additions include the pretty Seaview Cafe, and the rather avant-garde Vortex disco.

Additional amenities include: Complimentary 24-hour Room-Service, Supervised Youth program, Internet/WiFi Access, Laundry.

Follows the complete list of Jewel of the Seas lounges, clubs and other entertainment venues for kids, teens and adults.

  • Coral Theatre (features grand production shows with dance, acrobatics, comedy and games)

  • Vortex Disco and Nightclub (126-seat, with a revolving bar)

  • Photo Gallery and Shop; Art Gallery

  • The Centrum (social hub, offers aerial acrobatics entertainment); Serengeti Club (40-seat card room); Safari Club Lounge (320-seat; hosts art auctions, karaoke, religious services); Zanzibar Lounge (52-seat); Next Cruise Lounge; Concierge Club (196-seat suite and past guests only); Yacht Club Lounge; Viking Crown Lounge and Bar

  • Lobby Bar (47-seat atrium bar); Champagne Bar (52-seat wine bar); Game Reserves Bar (15-seat); Cafe Latte-tudes Bar (46-seat specialty coffee bar, Starbucks Coffee); The Pit Stop Bar (102-seat sports bar); Schooner Bar (134-seat piano bar); The Congo Bar; Sky Bar

  • Vintages (wine bar)

  • Centrum Boutiques (duty-free; clothes, perfumes, accessories, jewelry, logo souvenirs, General Store/alcohol and cigarettes)

  • Casino Royale (258-seat)

  • Royal Caribbean Online center (Internet computers room; 24-hour)

  • Vitality at Sea Spa and Fitness Center; 3 jacuzzis; 2 pools

  • Solarium lounge (includes Cafe Bar, pool bar and adults only pool area)

  • Cinema (57-seat)

  • Video Games Arcade; Fuel Teen Disco club; Royal Babies and Tots Nursery

  • Adventure Beach; Adventure Ocean kids lounge area

  • Sports Court (golf simulator, table tennis, basketball court); Jogging Track; Rock-climbing Wall; Fairways of Jewel Golf Course.

  • During the ship's 2016 refurbishment were added digital signage boards (numerous touch-screens throughout the ship), also the Wi-Fi coverage was upgraded (to shipwide) and the fast-speed VOOM Internet is now available.

No decks

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